MARK214 | CONTEXUAL STATMENT + DA

HERE is think link to my DA 60 second presentation with rave music in the background for added fun 🙂

My group and I created an innovative robot shopper named MARK214. Our product is a robot designed to independently move throughout a supermarket to assist shoppers in the store. The robot’s PR nickname is ‘Markey’ – a unisex name derived from ‘market’ – thus personalising and humanising the robot. MARK214 looks like a traditional robot – with a head containing an electronic Light Emitting Diode (LED) screen at the front – featuring a face that can communicate via the written word, images and pictures and can form facial expressions to show emotion. Another, larger screen located on its chest can display specific product information, i.e. in-store location, price, any ingredients and/or nutritional values. MARK214 will print out customers’ shopping lists and coupons related to sales items. MARK214 will have a torso, movable arms and legs and will sit on a base with concealed wheels to enable its movement around the store, because humans relate better to a machine replicating themselves. According to the article, ‘Robotics Facial Expression of Anger in Collaborative Human-Robot Interaction’, by Reyes, Meza and Pineda, “Facial expression … helps to synchronise, organise, and complete social interactions. …artificial emotional systems have been proposed to enhance the interaction between humans and robots.” (Reyes, M, Meza, I, Pineda, L, 2019).

According to Ben Forgan’s report, ‘What Robots Can Do for Retail’, “Robots have the potential to be an extremely beneficial addition to supermarkets” (Forgan B 2020); like robots answering simple questions, collecting data and freeing workers from routine tasks. If such robots are advantageous to an organisation and to the community by assisting with an everyday (yet important) task like grocery shopping, we determined we could create a more innovative robot, like the MARK214, with an increased communication capability and other higher-order functions. MARK214 can also deal with some of the problems created by COVID-19. The robot’s personal shopper and store cleaning/sanitising functions helps protect the vulnerable from this disease.

In the years to come, customers can hope to see their in-store experience fusing considerably more computerized functionalities, similar to versatile standardized identification examining of items that calls up surveys, value examinations and modified blending suggestions dependent on dietary inclinations and buy designs.

Individual Reflection and perspective on pitch concept

I was very happy with how our team collaborated overall, we all worked as a team, fairly and kindly. We communicated quite well and everyone was brainstorming ideas from the beginning to help come up with what is MARK214. Our pitch concept had good feedback, however, I like our concept, I think that we could of made it more unique from the start and did a bit more research on robot shoppers. Our tutor point3ed out to us in our pitch feedback that amazon had a similar product going on which we were unaware of before hand. I believe that with added research and information, our product could have been slightly more innovative and unique to our pitch audience. However, in saying this, taking this feedback in from task 1, we added elements to our robot such as mobile app connectivity, uber linking etc. we developed quite an innovative product that was different from other robotic shoppers out there. I am happy with how everything turned out. I believe that the DA video will offer some promotional insight and the words and statements I used are marketing credentials that will hopefully strike a wider audience and get our product to be heard!

References

Reyes, M, Meza, I, Pineda, L 2019, Robotics facial expression of anger in collaborative human–robot interaction, SAGE, vol. 16, no. 1, 6 January, viewed 12 May 2021, <https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1729881418817972>.

Forgan, B 2020. ‘What Robots Can Do for Retail’, Harvard Business Review, 1 October, viewed 11 May 2021, <https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/hbr.org/amp/2020/10/what-robots-can-do-for-retail>.

Published by gracemaryb

Bachelor of Communications and Media // 3rd year // Majoring in Social and Digital Media 😊

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: